Rams are expected to hire Kevin Carberry as offensive line coach

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thirteen28

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Didn't Kromer also run a ZBS as Carberry does? If so, can any of you OL experts fill me in on the differences between what the two like to do with their O-linemen?

Either way, I'm glad to see some acknowledgement from McVay that there were OL issues last year. If he was happy with they way things were, I don't think Kromer would have gone anywhere (absent some extenuating circumstances, like Kromer making a pass at McVay's girl).
 
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Soul Surfer

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FWIW Carberry runs a ZBS as he coached under Bill Callahan in Washington & Dallas...Some information on the ZBS:

Zone Blocking in the Running Game
In the running game a ZBS is ideal for a team with quick athletic linemen. It’s no longer about just blocking the guy in front of you and many times requires you to block the guy in front of someone else.

The first task of an offensive lineman is to identify whether he is “covered” or “uncovered”. This will determine exactly who the offensive lineman will block. Whether an offensive lineman is covered or not is based on the direction of the play and the technique (or positioning) of the defensive linemen.

For instance, if the play is going left and the center (Travis Frederick) has a defender lined up on his left shoulder (the direction of the play) he is “covered”. So in this case when the play begins Frederick will block this DT lined up over his left shoulder. Easy enough, right?

Dec 16, 2012; Arlington, TX, USA; Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel (99) tackles Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray (29) at Cowboys Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports
Here’s the twist. If that same DT lines up directly over Travis Fredericks head in the zero technique (rather than the left shoulder) the assignment can change and just because he’s now 8 inches to the right, he is no longer Fredericks blocking assignment. With 1 DT in zero technique, now say a second defensive lineman is lined up directly over the left Guard. Travis Frederick would be responsible to block that player over the left guard rather than the player directly over him. It sounds strange but think of it like this:


The offensive line is required to flow in the direction the ball is moving. Who they block depends on the positioning of the defense. So the offense could run the exact same running play two times in a row and the offensive linemen could block entirely different players both times. That is because the defense dictates how they will be blocked and by whom.

What this does is it opens multiple running lanes as the play develops. The runner is required to run patiently and find the right lane to burst through. Often times a cutback lane becomes available because of over-pursuit and cunning offensive linemen using a defenders speed and aggressiveness against him.

In 2012 the Dallas Cowboys were frequently beaten at the point of contact. 8 out of 10 times the Cowboys line was manhandled by their opponent across from them. Playing a ZBS can tip the balance back in the offenses favor if executed properly because it doesn’t relay solely upon strength.

Dec 16, 2012; Arlington, TX, USA; Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo (9) throws in the pocket as center Ryan Cook (63) blocks against Pittsburgh Steelers nose tackle Casey Hampton (98) at Cowboys

Zone Blocking against the Blitz
Zone Blocking is often times more effective against the blitz too. In a typical Man Blocking Scheme, running a stunt or blitz can be extremely difficult to handle. Last season defenses knew this so they frequently blitzed and stunted (up the middle mostly) against the Cowboys. With a ZBS even the most exotic blitzes can be effectively handled. The offensive lineman is responsible for blocking a zone and if two players blitz through the zone it no longer ends in certain tragedy.

As long as the ZBS is executed correctly it can succeed. TE’s are required to double team, seal the edge on the backside, and get downfield to block the next level. ZBS is ideal for a 2 TE offense because of the versatility they provide. Everyone’s assignment is based on what the defense does so it’s inevitably adaptable. Pre-snap it looks the exact same as a MBS so the defense isn’t sure what to expect until it’s already happening.

That Cowboys line they're talking about was one of the best in the NFL ALL-TIME in my opinion.
Travis Frederick Zack Martin Tyron Smith Doug Free La'el Collins :oops:

I was so jealous.
Because we had Jeff Fisher and his idea of building an offensive line.
 

Soul Surfer

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Yes, we ran a ZBS under Kromer but it was a bit of a hybrid because I think I saw maybe 10% man.

The man blocking was probably just to throw the defense off from consistent ZBS.

This Carberry though, comes from a good long line of zbs technicians.

I'm not scared anymore and actuallly a little bit excited!
(y):ROFLMAO:(y)
 

Karate61

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Later Carberry! Thanks for your services and great work. Good luck with your new head coaching gig!

Note: Just getting ahead for next season's offseason!
 

FrantikRam

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Hahahahahahahha!! You're just finding a cheap excuse to have a problem! It was sarcasm.

I'm always an optimist when it comes to the rams... but the thing that's cringe-worthy to me is the attitude that we can have all this turnover, lose key players, our entire coaching staff, our only good OL is 64 years old and not every hire will be an upgrade - but we should all act like it because McVay + Stafford.
I guarantee I'm not the only one here noticing some hypocrisy lately.

I believe in McVay and think Stafford offers an upgrade for a few years... but I don't subscribe to this instant contender fantasy.
Sorry that makes you supposedly cringe. I guess if you're trying to have a problem, it's easy to find one.

It's clear you're the one with the problem. You came into a thread about hiring a new OL coach and sarcastically said we don't need one.

It just makes no sense, and because you've made your stance known regarding McVay and the trade, its just....well, cringe. It probably comes off better if you were happy with the trade.

The instant contender comment is odd too - mostly because it's not "instant" - we were a final 8 team last year and will return at least 7-8 starters on offense and likely 7-8 on defense.
 
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WestCoastRam

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Yes, we ran a ZBS under Kromer but it was a bit of a hybrid because I think I saw maybe 10% man.

The man blocking was probably just to throw the defense off from consistent ZBS.

This Carberry though, comes from a good long line of zbs technicians.

I'm not scared anymore and actuallly a little bit excited!
(y):ROFLMAO:(y)
Yeah, McVay began to add in more man blocking, Duo, pulling guards and such once defenses really keyed with the 6-1.
 
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CGI_Ram

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FWIW Carberry runs a ZBS as he coached under Bill Callahan in Washington & Dallas...Some information on the ZBS:

Zone Blocking in the Running Game
In the running game a ZBS is ideal for a team with quick athletic linemen. It’s no longer about just blocking the guy in front of you and many times requires you to block the guy in front of someone else.

The first task of an offensive lineman is to identify whether he is “covered” or “uncovered”. This will determine exactly who the offensive lineman will block. Whether an offensive lineman is covered or not is based on the direction of the play and the technique (or positioning) of the defensive linemen.

For instance, if the play is going left and the center (Travis Frederick) has a defender lined up on his left shoulder (the direction of the play) he is “covered”. So in this case when the play begins Frederick will block this DT lined up over his left shoulder. Easy enough, right?

Dec 16, 2012; Arlington, TX, USA; Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel (99) tackles Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray (29) at Cowboys Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports
Here’s the twist. If that same DT lines up directly over Travis Fredericks head in the zero technique (rather than the left shoulder) the assignment can change and just because he’s now 8 inches to the right, he is no longer Fredericks blocking assignment. With 1 DT in zero technique, now say a second defensive lineman is lined up directly over the left Guard. Travis Frederick would be responsible to block that player over the left guard rather than the player directly over him. It sounds strange but think of it like this:


The offensive line is required to flow in the direction the ball is moving. Who they block depends on the positioning of the defense. So the offense could run the exact same running play two times in a row and the offensive linemen could block entirely different players both times. That is because the defense dictates how they will be blocked and by whom.

What this does is it opens multiple running lanes as the play develops. The runner is required to run patiently and find the right lane to burst through. Often times a cutback lane becomes available because of over-pursuit and cunning offensive linemen using a defenders speed and aggressiveness against him.

In 2012 the Dallas Cowboys were frequently beaten at the point of contact. 8 out of 10 times the Cowboys line was manhandled by their opponent across from them. Playing a ZBS can tip the balance back in the offenses favor if executed properly because it doesn’t relay solely upon strength.

Dec 16, 2012; Arlington, TX, USA; Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo (9) throws in the pocket as center Ryan Cook (63) blocks against Pittsburgh Steelers nose tackle Casey Hampton (98) at Cowboys

Zone Blocking against the Blitz
Zone Blocking is often times more effective against the blitz too. In a typical Man Blocking Scheme, running a stunt or blitz can be extremely difficult to handle. Last season defenses knew this so they frequently blitzed and stunted (up the middle mostly) against the Cowboys. With a ZBS even the most exotic blitzes can be effectively handled. The offensive lineman is responsible for blocking a zone and if two players blitz through the zone it no longer ends in certain tragedy.

As long as the ZBS is executed correctly it can succeed. TE’s are required to double team, seal the edge on the backside, and get downfield to block the next level. ZBS is ideal for a 2 TE offense because of the versatility they provide. Everyone’s assignment is based on what the defense does so it’s inevitably adaptable. Pre-snap it looks the exact same as a MBS so the defense isn’t sure what to expect until it’s already happening.

Lots to like about this hire...

For me, this is the biggest... his expertise in ZBS.
 

TSFH Fan

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This is cool. Stanford used a big fullback, Houston Heimuli @ 260+ lbs. This hiring has to increase the chances of the Rams picking Heimuli up, even as a UDFA (or Ben Mason).

A little about Stanford's run game:

There have been eyebrows raised at Stanford’s continued recruitment at the fullback position, but Stanford has proven on the field that they have a plan for that position and it’s going to remain a cog in the Cardinal’s offense. We saw more of the traditional Cardinal run game against Washington, and Coach Shaw said that was very much tied to Houston Heimuli rounding into form. “Houston maybe wasn't completely healthy early on in the season and has gotten healthy as the season has gone on. And it's very rare that football coaches say ‘Hey, let's get our fullback going.’ But that's what we've said the last couple of weeks is that Houston is feeling good and he's one of those guys that you want to put in the front of the play because he'll get after people and I won't mention his height. But he's right around 260. He's not six foot, he's right around 260. And he’s got a great pop. So that power play, that power play starts with the fullback and the guy setting the edge and coming downhill and those outside stretch plays. Whoever's on the edge, the fullback’s got to kick that guy out so we can find a crease. And gosh, I think he was perfect today. He was so good. All of his guys got blocked, those guys got moved out of the way. We were able to get back to and through the line of scrimmage. We're really excited. We know we lost Jay Symonds for the rest of the year so really, we have one fullback and we're kind of training a couple other guys if we need them but Houston was really good today.”
 

PARAM

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I would be happy as a pig in shit if we drafted a FB and made him a viable part of the offense. I like the kid from Michigan. I've always wondered why Shanahan gets so much out of his FB (and McVay doesn't see a need for one)......good in the run game, good as a receiver, good taking a surprise handoff on short yardage. Utilizing a FB adds another dimension to the offense both predictable and unpredictable......

But getting back to Callahan's protege.....what does he have to work with? What changes do you see coming. Big Whit back at LT? Havenstein? Or will he be traded/released to free up cap space for a UFA C? And what about the kids? Who's a keeper? Corbett, Edwards, Evans, Noteboom, Anchrum.....surely not Demby and Allen.
 

oldnotdead

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Zone blocking schemes come in all flavors. For example, when the Rams ran the outside zone in 2019 it was a simplistic version with a horizontal concept. They had more success this year when they ran it with a vertical concept. In 2019 they simply pushed the d horizontally and the RB looked for the gap created by a loss of gap discipline by the front 7. If they maintained discipline the play was stuffed. In 2020 they ran both styles of the outside zone but because of it the play was a "tell". In the vertical concept the o-line creates the gap by driving the front 7 off the LOS, the RB must identify where the gap will be and exploit it. In 2020 when the play was play-action the o-line consistently used the horizontal concept reserving the vertical concept strictly for runs. The better-coached defenses began to recognize this so that a good LB realizing he was the backside and seeing the horizontal nature of the blocking would drop off and be waiting for Goff's play fake.

The same also applied to their inside zone but again it was more of impeding the d-front not attacking them. They didn't run their inside zone nearly as much as they should have. Why? You need a good mobile Center capable of attacking the ILB and Blythe simply was very poor at that. What is a head-scratcher in terms of Kromer is that zone techniques, both inside and outside are the most common techniques used by high schools and colleges. Accordingly, young players already would have more than a passing familiarity with the technique. What this means is that Kromer knew less about this than his young players and he knew it.

The hiring of Carberry IMO confirms my suspicion that Kromer was let go because of his inability to develop young players. Running a power gap scheme really isn't a stretch from running an outside zone with a vertical concept or an inside zone for that matter as the concepts are similar. I truly believe Sean wants to move to a power run attack and for that, he needs an o-line coach who knows how to implement it. Carberry looks like the perfect hire with a coach familiar with the NFL, and has a proven track record of success in developing young talent. This is the kind of coach you hire if you as an HC and GM feel you have good talent already on the team that simply needs to be properly coached up.

Put me down as someone who really likes this hire.