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Rams Coaching Interviews:It's official, McVay hired

Discussion in 'RAMS - NFL TALK' started by CGI_Ram, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. Prime Time

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  2. JackDRams

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  3. PhillyRam

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  4. LoyalRam

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    I knew that, but isn't that back-assward in the first place?
     
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  5. Merlin

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    http://theramswire.usatoday.com/2017/01/02/los-angeles-rams-head-coach-candidate-interviews/

    Here are all the candidates Rams plan to interview for head coach job

    By: Bryan Kalbrosky | 6 hours ago

    The Los Angeles Rams have many names on their watch list to fill their head coaching vacancy. We will update this post as we learn more.

    [​IMG]
    Could Mike Shanahan become Rams GM with Kyle Shanahan as head coach?

    Kyle Shanahan (Offensive Coordinator, Atlanta)
    The Falcons offensive coordinator appears to be the early favorite for the job. He has done a tremendous job with the Atlanta offense and Matt Ryan.

    Between Friday and Saturday, #Falcons OC Kyle Shanahan will do HC interviews with #Rams, #Jaguars, #Broncos & #49ers, sources say.

    — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) January 2, 2017



    He will interview between January 6 and January 7.

    [​IMG]
    Rams will request interview with Falcons' Kyle Shanahan for coach

    Sean McVay (Offensive Coordinator, Washington)
    For a coach who’s only 30, McVay has already accomplished quite a bit during his career. His work with Kirk Cousins is especially impressive.

    He will reportedly interview for the job on January 5.

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    Washington offensive coordinator Sean McVay is a sleeper for Rams job

    Josh McDaniels or Matt Patricia (Patriots Coordinators)
    The two Patriots coaches are both fantastic options if they’re willing to leave New England for next season.

    #Patriots OC Josh McDaniels will get plenty of requests. My understanding is he’ll do 3 interviews late this week: #Rams, #Jaguars, #49ers.

    — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) January 2, 2017



    McDaniels will reportedly interview for the Rams job later this week.

    [​IMG]
    Rams plan to interview Patriots OC Josh McDaniels and DC Matt Patricia

    Harold Goodwin (Arizona Offensive Coordinator)
    The Arizona offensive coordinator destroyed Los Angeles during the final game of the season. He was a former offensive line coach, which is perhaps the biggest need for the Rams.

    Rams, Jags and Bills all expected to interview Cardinals offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin for their head coaching job, per sources.

    — Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) January 1, 2017



    Anthony Lynn (Buffalo Offensive Coordinator)
    The Buffalo interim coach will likely stay with the Bills, but if he doesn’t, the Rams would love to have him as their head coach.

    [​IMG]
    Rams among teams interested in Bills interim coach Anthony Lynn

    Steve Wilks (Carolina defensive back coach)
    Wilks is an assistant coach for the Carolina Panthers who also coaches the defensive backs. He doesn’t exactly seem to fit the needs of the organization.

    The #Rams will interview secondary coach and assistant head coach Steve Wilks for their HC job, source said. He has filled in for Rivera

    — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) January 2, 2017



    Vance Joseph (Miami defensive coordinator)
    The Miami Dolphins defensive coordinator is considered a favorite for the Chargers job.

    The #Rams and #Bills are requesting permission to speak with #Dolphins DC Vance Joseph, sources say. #Chargers, too.

    — Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) January 2, 2017



    He played defensive back for the New York Jets as well as the Indianapolis Colts.

    [​IMG]
    Josh McDaniels, Kyle Shanahan are favorites to become next Rams coach
     
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  6. Merlin

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    http://mmqb.si.com/mmqb/2016/01/19/nfl-head-coach-interviews-the-mmqb-jenny-vrentas

    Interviewing to Become an NFL Head Coach

    Before their introductory press conferences, NFL head coaches endure a grueling hiring process. Here’s what goes on behind closed doors

    [​IMG]
    Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
    Five team executives, seated around a conference table, introduced themselves. They gave their names, and briefly, their backgrounds. Then, they got right down to business.

    “How would you change the culture of our team?” one asked.

    That’s how the job interview began for one of the seven NFL teams in the market for a new head coach this January. No two interviews are alike, not even between candidates interviewing with the same team. But the objective is always the same: Over the course of a few hours, NFL executives are trying to figure out if the person sitting in front of them has what it takes to lead their football team.

    There’s more to it than just one meeting: phone calls, checking references around the league, and the candidates’ on-field résumé. But what happens in the interview can make or break a coach’s career aspirations. For a peek behind closed doors, we talked to several people who have sat on both sides of the interview table, this year and in years past.

    The “room” can be anywhere: a team’s headquarters, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross’ New York business office, a New York hotel while 49ers brass was in town for league meetings, or a conference room at Paul Brown Stadium the day after Hue Jackson’s Bengals lost in the wild-card round. Teams book first-class plane tickets for candidates who are traveling to meet them, send a limo to the airport, and put them up at five-star hotels. Interviews are often scheduled in three-hour blocks, but they almost always last longer—four, five, maybe six hours if everyone is hitting it off. (Pro tip: eat beforehand, because no one is breaking for lunch.)

    There’s been a shift over the past few hiring cycles, from the candidates making a presentation to teams now leading the conversation. “Teams want to control the interview,” says one coach who interviewed this year.

    One team began with the question about changing the culture. Another opened with, “Why do you think you should be the head coach of the (insert team name here)?” One candidate recalled being asked, “Do we have a chance to win in (insert city here)?”

    Team owners have to sell whomever they hire to their locker room and their fan base, but first their next head coach has to sell himself: What is his vision for turning the team around, and how will he put that vision into motion? Take out the guesswork, agents tell their clients. Teams want to know the specifics of your vision. Charley Casserly, the former Washington and Houston general manager who serves on the NFL’s career development advisory panel, reminds prospective head coaches of a phrase he once heard that speaks to the essence of the interview process: “How are you going to win a game?”

    “You’d be surprised,” says one team executive who hired a new head coach this year. “People really reveal themselves.”

    Here’s an example of what that means: The candidate who said his vision for the offense will be whatever the coordinator wants is not ready to be a head coach. Here’s another: If an offensive coordinator interviewing for a head-coaching job still wants to draw cards for the game, that’s a sign he hasn’t graduated to being the CEO of a team.

    The longest block of time in most interviews is spent going over the candidate’s prospective staff. Coaching positions are in flux at this time of year, and you’re not always able to get the assistant you want, so candidates have to present a depth chart—three or four deep—of their top choices at every position from the coordinators to the position coaches. Be prepared to defend your choices if the team doesn’t like them. One owner, for example, vetoed a candidate’s third choice for a coordinator during their first interview.

    “Staff is the single most important thing, because it shows judgment,” says Casserly, who was a consultant for the Jets coach and GM searches last year. “Everything else in the interview can be scripted, but staff is judgment. If he has the staff wrong, I’m not going to hire him.”

    A significant chunk of time is also spent on the team’s player personnel—not so much whom to cut, because cleaning up salary cap issues is the GM’s job. But what is the coach’s plan for making it work with players the team is committed to financially, such as a disgruntled star who’s earning more than the coach, or a regressing quarterback? Adam Gase won over the Dolphins by explaining his philosophy that coaching a quarterback can’t be one-size-fits all, backed by his experience blending different offensive systems and styles to best suit the spectrum of QBs he’s coached: Tim Tebow, Peyton Manning, Jay Cutler and now Ryan Tannehill.

    What other pieces do you need? Casserly recalls Joe Gibbs telling Washington, I can get 1,000-yard receivers, but what I need to have is a bell-cow running back and an offensive line. Andy Reid told Philadelphia, I want two offensive tackles, a quarterback, two pass rushers, two corners, and I’ll figure the rest out.

    Coaches who are interviewing while still in the playoffs have a disadvantage because they don’t have the time to spend hours breaking down film of the teams they’re interviewing with. Agents help out by arming their clients with information. One spent hours calling active players on the teams his client would interview with, asking for insight on what went wrong, who are the problem players in the locker room, how often the owner is around, and so forth.

    One team executive says for coaches still in the playoffs, he tests their aptitude to evaluate talent based on what they know: the roster of the coach’s current team, his division opponents or even recent evaluations of college players entering the draft. He recalls one candidate in a past hiring cycle who eliminated himself because his player assessments were way off base. A player with a good 40-yard dash but who didn’t play fast, he called a really fast guy. He praised another player as instinctual when everyone else agreed his lack of instincts was one of his biggest weaknesses. An eye for talent can’t be taught. “I stopped counting at seven things he got wrong on players,” the evaluator said. “It becomes a percentage thing after a while.”

    Another integral part of the interview is assessing the prospective head coach’s ability to lead a roster of 53 men. It’s never a sure thing because teams are usually considering a former head coach who failed in his last NFL job; a college coach who has never led an NFL team; or an up-and-coming assistant trying to make the biggest jump of his career.

    To take out some of the guesswork, at least two teams within the past few years have used the input of psychologists during their coaching search. One team asked candidates to submit to a three-hour evaluation by a psychologist to assess strengths and weaknesses as a leader—not mandatory, but all the candidates agreed to it. Another team generated psychological profiles to see how the coach and GM would match with each other.

    That’s just one data point, of course. A lot of the conversation in the interview room is centered on how the potential coach would lead, in good times or bad. As one executive puts it, “How are they going to be on a Monday morning after their third loss in a row?”

    Here are some of the questions candidates were asked this year:

    What will your first meeting with your players be like?

    How will you relate to millennials and keep your approach fresh?

    Do you believe coaches or scouts should have final say on personnel evaluations?

    What is your discipline policy when players get in off-the-field trouble?

    If a star player doesn’t show up to offseason workouts, how will that affect the team, and how will you respond?

    What is a time when you faced adversity as a coach, and how did you respond?

    Here’s how one candidate answered the adversity question: He cited a time when his team traded for a player whom he soon realized had trouble learning, to the point where it had affected his playing time with his previous team. The coach spent $600 an hour to meet with a sports and performance psychologist, learning how to become a better teacher to a slow learner. The player went on to have a career-best season under his new coach. Days later, his answer stuck out in the minds of the people he’d met with, even after they’d done several more interviews.

    Sometimes the smallest details say the most: Casserly recalls that when Todd Bowles interviewed with the Jets, the fact that he was so in command of the conversation and never once opened his notes impressed everyone in the room.

    Interviews are a two-way street. Those who interviewed with the Browns, for example, had to ask questions about how the new power structure with EVP of football operations Sashi Brown and chief strategy officer Paul DePodesta would work. A veteran coach like Tom Coughlin would have been expected to have long conversations with the Eagles about how much power they would be willing to give him in the organization.

    As far as deciding which interviews to take, it depends on the candidate and the situation. Two agents said they would have been hesitant to send clients to Tampa Bay this year, since it felt like the organization went into the search already intending to hire Dirk Koetter. Minority coaches have an additional layer to consider: Are they a serious candidate, or simply a formality so the team can satisfy the Rooney Rule? Less experienced candidates look at interviews as advertisements for the future—or, possibly, a runner-up prize, a coordinator job with the same team.

    Casserly tells the coaches he advises to finish every interview the same way: “I want this job.” Most candidates give team executives a “leave-behind packet,” a magazine-length pamphlet that lays out their career path, their coaching influences, a résumé detailing stats and players they’ve worked with and their plan for the team, including nitty-gritty details like practice schedules and team itineraries for road trips. The prospective coaches put these together themselves during the offseason.

    Those who have been through the process before are willing to help. At a career development symposium at Penn in 2014, Panthers coach Ron Rivera passed out his interview notes to all the aspiring head coaches in attendance. It all helps, but just as there’s not one right way to coach, there’s not one right way to interview, either.

    “Be yourself. That’s the most important thing I have learned, especially this time around,” says Gase, who landed the Miami job after interviewing with nine teams between this year and last. “Last time, mostly, I was a little nervous going into the process. And if you are nervous, you can’t truly be yourself. This time I felt a lot more comfortable. I could articulate exactly how I felt about so many situations. My passion and my energy came out. I really feel like, this year, teams saw who I really am. So what I would say to guys out there, just go in there and be yourself every minute you are in the room with them.”
     
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  7. JackAttack85

    Ramless in Seattle
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    If this happens, I will jokingly drive the getaway car...and I'd have to drive down from Seattle.
     
  8. JackAttack85

    Ramless in Seattle
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    Has anyone heard if Fisher's kid is going to be interviewed?
     
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  9. HitStick

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    Hell no. He brings the beard or he stays away.

    If that were to happen, I'd turn in my horns.
     
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  10. den-the-coach

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    Not going to happen, but maybe a compromise.
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. JackDRams

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    @CGI_Ram can you merge this with our coaching sticky thread? Otherwise two separate threads of the same thing will break out. Thanks.
     
  12. RaminExile

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    Getting cold sweats reading this....I hate the interview process; especially at big time firms. Now I'm not an NFL HC candidate but I've had some assessments like this that go on over three days....

    Some guys love it. Some don't. I think what people hiring have to understand is that being a slick 'rick in the boardroom on interview day might not make you a great head coach. Lets hope they get it right.
     
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  13. thirteen28

    I like pizza.
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    Yep. Linehan allegedly killed it in his interview with the Rams. As head coach? Not so much ...
     
  14. Zodi

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    Yeah, but then you have to realize who was interviewing him haha.

    I'm excited for a new coach! Got my hopes set on McDaniels or Payton, but I'll be happy either way for the simple fact that I truly believe this is the most talented Rams team since 2006, and we're the right staff bringing in the right offense away from being perennial playoff contenders.
     
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  15. Prime Time

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    [​IMG]

    Bluto for new Rams head coach.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Prime Time

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    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/01/03/rams-expected-to-interview-steve-wilks/

    Rams expected to interview Steve Wilks
    Posted by Josh Alper on January 3, 2017

    [​IMG]

    The list of candidates for the Rams’ head coaching job has quickly taken shape since the end of the regular season on Sunday.

    Adam Schefter of ESPN reports that it includes Panthers assistant head coach Steve Wilks. Per Schefter, Wilks will interview with the team in the near future.

    Wilks, who also coaches the Panthers’ defensive backs, has been on the staff in Carolina since 2012 and has been an NFL assistant since joining the Bears’ staff in 2006. He worked with current Panthers head coach Ron Rivera in both Chicago and San Diego before making the move to Carolina in Rivera’s second year as head coach.

    Wilks’ name hasn’t come up with any of the other openings this offseason, but the Bills have shown interest in speaking to Panthers defensive coordinator Sean McDermott about their head coaching vacancy.

    [Photo: Panthers.com]
     
  17. dieterbrock

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    Well, that will satisfy the Rooney rule
     
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  18. Ram65

    Rams Time To Turn It Around
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    Make the trade for Payton.................................................................. upload_2017-1-3_11-50-35.jpeg


    Is it possible to have too many candidates and interviews?
     
  19. Merlin

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    Rams need to lock up a guy who can develop our QB and get the offense rolling. If they go with a guy with a defensive background it's gonna be rough, because whoever he brings in as OC will either be here for one season if they kill it, or will be fired and waste another year of non-development of not only the QB but key offensive players.

    Way I see it right now It has to be one of Shanahan, McDaniels, or McVay. All three of those guys are capable of maximizing offensive investments and getting this clown show overhauled quicklike and in a hurry. IMO it will come down to who interviews the best and who has the best staff plan.

    I prefer McVay as I think he's got the right combo of things needed in LA. He's a young gun offensive mind but he also carries himself well and will be very good with the press and as the face of the franchise. But as long as it's an offensive up and comer I will be happy.
     
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  20. DaveFan'51

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    Will the Rams do need a Top to bottom overhaul, so this would make sense!
     
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