NFL Covid Stuff

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Mackeyser

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Have zero idea how they get a bad positive? It seems clear cut, a yes or a no. Not saying I'm a virologist or microbiologist but testing something for a yes or no shouldn't have so much error in it. I'm mind boggled on this.
People don't understand all the factors that go into a test.

Which type of swab was used? There's one that looks like a pipe cleaner (first one approved) and a Q-Tip looking one. The Q-Tip one is less comfortable if used properly (inserted all the way to the nasopharynx, the back of the nasal cavity)

Was the swab properly inserted all the way to the back? (from experience and anecdotal evidence, many administrators of the test accede to the discomfort of patients and don't push the swab all the way to the back, especially the larger, Q-Tip looking swabs as opposed to the pipe cleaner looking swabs).

Which type of test was used? Typically, rapid tests are meant to grab obvious positives. They are an effective screening tool, but should never be the ONLY tool used in any screening protocol. I would wager it was a rapid test false positive followed by two more comprehensive tests which both yielded negatives. As in almost all things, accuracy is sacrificed for rapidity

Lastly and especially for coronavirus testing of any kind (common cold, flu, SARS or COVID), the accuracy tends to be low (sub 80%) because initial testing could pick up antibodies relating to any of them, yielding false positives. They found this early in folks who'd had SARS. For diseases with low to no mutations, tests can and do tend to be very accurate. We know what to look for and design tests to be very specific. For diseases that can and do mutate, there a LOT of factors involved that can lead to both false positives and false negatives.

And that little tidbit barely scratches the surface.

Put it this way... there's not a single particle, molecule, cell, cell byproduct or process that we're testing for which is definitive, so it's not a binary "yes/no". Not in the way that a smallpox test would be, for example.

One day we may get to that point, but alas, we're pretty far from that.

We'll have widespread use of robotaxis and unmanned trucks on the highways in less than 10 years, but it'll be a LOT longer before medical science refines its understanding of the human body to have definitive tests like what you're referencing.

People are kinda complicated, it seems.
 

Elmgrovegnome

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Corbin

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People don't understand all the factors that go into a test.

Which type of swab was used? There's one that looks like a pipe cleaner (first one approved) and a Q-Tip looking one. The Q-Tip one is less comfortable if used properly (inserted all the way to the nasopharynx, the back of the nasal cavity)

Was the swab properly inserted all the way to the back? (from experience and anecdotal evidence, many administrators of the test accede to the discomfort of patients and don't push the swab all the way to the back, especially the larger, Q-Tip looking swabs as opposed to the pipe cleaner looking swabs).

Which type of test was used? Typically, rapid tests are meant to grab obvious positives. They are an effective screening tool, but should never be the ONLY tool used in any screening protocol. I would wager it was a rapid test false positive followed by two more comprehensive tests which both yielded negatives. As in almost all things, accuracy is sacrificed for rapidity

Lastly and especially for coronavirus testing of any kind (common cold, flu, SARS or COVID), the accuracy tends to be low (sub 80%) because initial testing could pick up antibodies relating to any of them, yielding false positives. They found this early in folks who'd had SARS. For diseases with low to no mutations, tests can and do tend to be very accurate. We know what to look for and design tests to be very specific. For diseases that can and do mutate, there a LOT of factors involved that can lead to both false positives and false negatives.

And that little tidbit barely scratches the surface.

Put it this way... there's not a single particle, molecule, cell, cell byproduct or process that we're testing for which is definitive, so it's not a binary "yes/no". Not in the way that a smallpox test would be, for example.

One day we may get to that point, but alas, we're pretty far from that.

We'll have widespread use of robotaxis and unmanned trucks on the highways in less than 10 years, but it'll be a LOT longer before medical science refines its understanding of the human body to have definitive tests like what you're referencing.

People are kinda complicated, it seems.
That’s exactly why I hated English and substantial courses because my mind works more as an binary language with some middle ground, but always imagined the testing was always more like a smallpox test. It makes sense it’s to new and not enough research has been done to get to that point I’m thinking of unfortunately.
 

Corbin

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CGI_Ram

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Ravens-Steelers game moved from Sunday to Tuesday

An important AFC North showdown is again changing places on the Week 12 schedule.

The game between Pittsburgh and Baltimore has been rescheduled to Tuesday night at 8 p.m., the NFL announced Friday, as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 situation within the Ravens organization. The game will be broadcast on NBC.

In a related change, should the Pittsburgh-Baltimore game be played as rescheduled on Tuesday, the Week 13 contest between Baltimore and Dallas -- which was originally slated for Thursday -- will be moved to Monday, Dec. 7 and will start at 5 p.m. ET. That game will be broadcast nationally on FOX, NFL Network and Amazon Prime.

The Week 12 match-up between fierce divisional rivals was originally slated for the primetime Thanksgiving slot, but was postponed to Sunday at 1:15 p.m. because of Baltimore's COVID-19 issues. With that situation yet to be resolved, the league has again moved the game to a slot similar to the one that was also occupied by Buffalo and Tennessee in October because of a separate COVID-19 situation involving the Titans.

Ravens coach John Harbaugh released a statement on Friday regarding the situation.

"We appreciate the efforts of the NFL and Pittsburgh Steelers throughout this process, while we all work to create an environment that keeps the health and safety of everyone involved at the forefront of each decision," the statement read. "Our organization has a plan in place, and we will be prepared to play the Steelers. We thank everyone for their adaptability and look forward to the challenge of facing a very good football team at Heinz Field on Tuesday night."

Within Thursday's round of COVID-19 testing, Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson tested positive and was ruled out for Sunday's game and despite the latest change still will not be able to play against the Steelers, NFL Network's Tom Pelissero reported. However, Pelissero noted that, based on the timeline, Jackson could possibly be available to play against the Cowboys. Jackson was among five Ravens -- also, Patrick Ricard, Justin Madubuike, Morgan Fox and practice squad offensive lineman Will Holden -- placed on the reserve/COVID-19 list on Friday.

The Steelers also placed three players on the reserve/COVID-19 list -- defensive end Stephon Tuitt, defensive tackle Isaiah Buggs and offensive lineman Jerald Hawkins.

All decisions "were made out of an abundance of caution to ensure the health and safety of players, coaches and game day personnel and in consultation with medical experts," the league said in a statement released Friday.
 

RamFanInPC

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This is f-in unreal.

When Santa Clara County released new COVID-19 restrictions on Saturday, it banned all contact sports and mandated a 14-day quarantine for anyone traveling into the area from 150 miles away. In short, it left the San Francisco 49ers searching for a new home to finish the season.
Niners officials spent Saturday working with NFL officials continuing to work on a plan for the rest of 2020, and as of late Saturday, nothing was set.
However, sources say the most likely option is for the 49ers to play their final three home games at State Farm Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals. Their NFC West rivals -- who actually host the Niners in Week 16 -- are said to be willing to accommodate them.
The league would like the 49ers to play in an NFL stadium if possible. Another option is for the 49ers to play at a stadium in Texas.

As for practice, there are still several options to consider. They could practice in Arizona and stay in a hotel for a month in a pseudo bubble. Another possibility would be to practice more than 150 miles away from their region -- allowing those with the team to see their families from time to time -- then travel to their new "home" stadium.
The Niners travel to play the Los Angeles Rams today, and they will return home before the ban goes into effect at midnight. Expect them to have a decision soon.
 

Merlin

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Niners could play 'home' games in Arizona due to COVID-19 restrictions

Published: Nov 29, 2020 at 07:57 AM

NFL Network Insider

Rapoport outlines 49ers' practice and game relocation, playoff bubble considerations

When Santa Clara County released new COVID-19 restrictions on Saturday, it banned all contact sports and mandated a 14-day quarantine for anyone traveling into the area from 150 miles away. In short, it left the San Francisco 49ers searching for a new home to finish the season.

Niners officials spent Saturday working with NFL officials continuing to work on a plan for the rest of 2020, and as of late Saturday, nothing was set.
However, sources say the most likely option is for the 49ers to play their final three home games at State Farm Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals. Their NFC West rivals -- who actually host the Niners in Week 16 -- are said to be willing to accommodate them.

The league would like the 49ers to play in an NFL stadium if possible. Another option is for the 49ers to play at a stadium in Texas.

As for practice, there are still several options to consider. They could practice in Arizona and stay in a hotel for a month in a pseudo bubble. Another possibility would be to practice more than 150 miles away from their region -- allowing those with the team to see their families from time to time -- then travel to their new "home" stadium.

The Niners travel to play the Los Angeles Rams today, and they will return home before the ban goes into effect at midnight. Expect them to have a decision soon.

Follow Ian Rapoport on Twitter.
 

Merlin

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I think Mexico City would make a great new home for them. Just sayin. :ROFLMAO:
 
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CGI_Ram

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Ravens-Steelers game moved to Wednesday

Due to continued COVID-19 concerns, the Baltimore Ravens-Pittsburgh Steelers football game has been moved to 3:40 p.m. ET Wednesday on NBC.

With the rescheduling, two other games have likewise been moved as the Steelers will host the Washington Football Team on Monday at 5 p.m. ET in the teams' Week 13 contest, which was originally slated for Sunday, while the Ravens will host the Dallas Cowboys on Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 8:05 p.m. ET on FOX/NFL Network/Amazon in a game that was first planned for Thursday. The Washington-Pittsburgh game's broadcast arrangement is to be announced at a later time.

This is the third time the Ravens-Steelers game -- originally scheduled for Thanksgiving night -- has been moved. Originally slated to be played on Thanksgiving night, it was postponed until Sunday and then moved a second time to Tuesday.

Ravens players recently conducted a players-only meeting in which they expressed concerns regarding playing on Tuesday as they've been adamant about wanting a day to practice, NFL Network's Ian Rapoport reported. Rapoport added that other notes to come from the meeting were that the Ravens want to play, but health and safety must come first. One source said: "Can't we have at least two days of negative tests after this outbreak before we are expected to get back on the field?"

The Ravens' facility is set to reopen Monday night with a walkthrough scheduled and a plan to practice on Tuesday before flying to Pittsburgh, NFL Network's Tom Pelissero reported.

On Monday, the Ravens activated four players from the reserve/COVID-19 list, but also placed four players on the list.

Tight end Mark Andrews , outside linebacker Matt Judon and receiver Willie Snead were placed on the list Monday, along with cornerback Terrell Bonds, though Bonds was previously on season-ending injured reserve. While those four were added, outside linebacker Jaylon Ferguson, guard D.J. Fluker and defensive linemen Broderick Washington and Iman Marshall were activated off the list.

Since the Ravens' Week 11 game when Baltimore last competed, 21 Ravens have been placed on the reserve/COVID-19 list and 19 are currently on it.

The Week 12 match-up between AFC North rivals was first moved from the prime-time Thanksgiving slot to Sunday at 1:15 p.m. because of Baltimore's COVID-19 issues. With that situation still lingering, the NFL once more moved the game to a Tuesday slot, which was similar to a rescheduling for Buffalo-Tennessee in October because of a separate COVID-19 situation involving the Titans.
 
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