49'ers 2022 San Francisco 49’ers Thread

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Neil039

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Trey Lance game is like Amy Schumer’s boobs. They look good but when you see the rest of the picture you tend to vomit in your mouth.
 

Ram Ts

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Trey Lance game is like Amy Schumer’s boobs. They look good but when you see the rest of the picture you tend to vomit in your mouth.
I think I’ll just take your word for it this time…and not find out for myself lol
 

CoachAllred

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That whole video is pretty good really. He talks about Stafford and McVay as well.
jmho , but i thought Mac jones would have been the perfect 9er ball QB
power football, play action and a stout defense.

I think Lynch is/was due for another one of those first round brain farts.
 

kurtfaulk

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dweebo re-followed the whiners on some social media app.

looks like reality has set in for him and he has accepted his fate.

.
 

ottoman89

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dweebo re-followed the whiners on some social media app.

looks like reality has set in for him and he has accepted his fate.

.
I was hoping he'd leave. Guess he'll have to be introduced to the newest Ram, Bobby Wagner.. again.
 

Merlin

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jmho , but i thought Mac jones would have been the perfect 9er ball QB
power football, play action and a stout defense.

I think Lynch is/was due for another one of those first round brain farts.
Yep. Shanny would have made Jones super efficient and his focus over entire games would have been really tough with that play design. I'm glad they went with the media.
 

So Ram

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Yep. Shanny would have made Jones super efficient and his focus over entire games would have been really tough with that play design. I'm glad they went with the media.

LOL
 

GBRam15

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Bumping.............just to say fuck the Niners. Happy Mother's Day!
 

oldnotdead

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The thing Colin left out is who is saying this about Lance? All QBs especially when they are young and developing need the offense to play to their strengths. Therefore it remains to be seen how Shanny is going to use Lance. They are a run first offense, so the QB doesn't have to carry the team in most games. Run the ball play good defense and use the pass enough to set up the run. That's how I see them using Lance. It's not much difference than how they wanted to use Jimmy G most of his time there.

Play a couple of years of that style and then they will know what they have or don't have in Trey. Learning to read defenses is an art. For the most part, if he can get his first 3 reads consistently that normally is good enough. After that then he should simply dump off or escape and run.

Colin's comments about Rodgers is spot on. Rodger is an ego-driven player and one year of that kind of offense will drive him into retirement. GB was stupid they should have traded Rodgers to Denver when they had the chance. Both the Vikings and the Lions look improved. GB isn't going to have the cakewalk they are used to in their division. Remember, Goff has beaten Rodgers, and if the Lion's defense is improved they are going to win some games. You can see that Goff was returning to form with a supportive coach who actually coached him. GB will face increased competition within their own division so it remains to be seen how they will fare this year since they don't look as strong this year as in previous years.
 

RamsSince1969

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What Amy Schumer is a perfect 6.
Thanks Dang! Love, Amy.
1652069630259.png
 

Steve808

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I wonder if rat boy saw Lamar Jackson and Kyler Murray at the time and said I gotta get me on of those running types.

Hopefully the whiners gave up a king's ransom for someone they'll trade away for a 7th round pick in 2-3 years. :)
 

dpjax

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Quietly, the 49ers replaced quarterback coach Rich Scangarello this offseason with former NFL quarterback Brian Griese, who never has coached in his life. Now, Scangarello is the offensive coordinator at the University of Kentucky.

Why did the 49ers make the switch? Scangarello went on a podcast with Greg Cosell this offseason and explained how he evaluates draft-eligible quarterbacks. Here's what Scangerallo said. Tell me if he sounds like someone who wanted to coach Trey Lance:

Q: What properties in a college quarterback are teams looking for in the NFL?

SCANGARELLO: "Bottom line is do they have the toughness to stand in the pocket when they're getting hit and deliver when it matters most? If you cannot do that, and you cannot show me that on your college tape, I find it very difficult for you to be a top-tier quarterback in the NFL. I would say that's where most people in the evaluation process run into problems when they don't really take that one trait, in a contested pocket, how a quarterback plays a game in college football, and really evaluates those moments in a guy's career."

Q: In college football, there are lots of quarterbacks who don't work out of muddy, noisy pockets very often. You and I talked about Trevor Lawrence last summer, and in going through all of his tape, there were just 34 plays in which he actually worked through a muddy, noise pocket, and that's obviously not a large sample size to make a judgement about his ability to do that at the NFL level.

SCANGARELLO: "If you evaluate someone how they throw on air, or if they're in a system in college where the coach is telling them where to throw the ball before the snap and they know a small amount of plays, what's good against certain coverages, those things don't really mean anything to me in the evaluation process. If you're watching a (Pro Day) workout that a guy has been through 20 times and his coach has taught him the routine and you think that is going to determine his value in this league, I think you're going to miss a lot of the time. That's not real football. And these kids have been doing it since they were 15-years old and know how to master those things. There are no variables -- they're just throwing on air. You show me a guy, all his clips throughout his career, where they take it in the chin and not turn it down and make good decisions, or when the pocket is pushed on them -- that's the league. That's what it takes in the NFL. If you can't do that, you're not going to get that overnight in the NFL, and that's always going to be where you miss on a guy. If you can't see that in a player and there's not a lot of it on tape -- let's say Trevor (Lawrence) for example, and there have been other guys, Dwayne Haskins comes to mind, I think he was touched like 18 times in his senior year. It was ridiculous how few times he was in a contested pocket. If you're going to overlook those things, then you're going to have a huge margin for error with a miss on a guy."

Q: How do you evaluate quarterbacks who went to smaller schools such as Josh Allen and Trey Lance?

SCANGARELLO: "One of my favorite things about quarterbacks historically, the mid-major to smaller Power 5 schools -- those over the history of time have been some of the best players in this league. And when you can take a quarterback who's a multi-year starter at a mid-major for example, and he can take them a level that they've never season -- let's say they're an average program, and then all of a sudden for two years they're winning conference titles or competing for it -- that tells me that quarterback has the ability to raise the level of everyone around him. For Josh Allen at Wyoming, the two years he was there, they won more games than probably ever in the history of that program. They had never had eight-win seasons. I think they'd had one or two in the whole history of the program. That tells me the guy is a winner and he has the ability to elevate the people around him. Those things are important to me."

Q: What other quarterback traits are non-negotiables for you?

SCANGARELLO: "If you have any aspirations of playing a guy Year 1, he better have been a multi-year starter in college. To me, the experiences and taking the snaps and what you do when you're in charge and banking those reps are so important. You come out, you're a one-year guy, it's very difficult for you to just jump in and play in the league. You just haven't played enough football to hone your craft. So I'm always looking for guys who have a lot of starts. Do they take care of the football in those moments when it could go sideways, or do they create positive plays? Do they make smart decisions in critical situations? How do they play in two-minute situations? There are guys I've evaluated in recent drafts where they're on such good teams at Ohio State or these other schools where maybe they don't even have a two-minute situation that really matters in their entire career. Give me a guy who has played a lot of one-score games and found a way to win, and show me in those situations how he is under duress."

Q: What do you think of Kenny Pickett?

SCANGARELLO: "You could throw him in the Mac Jones mold. He's a multi-year starter, he took Pitt to some real high-level play, he has been very good with the ball, he's tough, he's good under duress, he won big games in the clutch -- all those things bode well...What is the elite trait? Do you want a guy who throws it hard and 70 yards or a guy that runs really fast, or do you want a guy who throws with anticipation, on time, allows Y.A.C., processes, a natural leader, those qualities?"

Let's summarize what Scangerallo said he values:

1. A quarterback who faced heavy pressure in the pocket during college and wasn't a Pro Day wonder (i.e. not Lance. North Dakota State had terrific pass protection, and he had a phenomenal Pro Day).
2. A quarterback who elevated his program (i.e. not Lance. North Dakota State is the best program in the FCS. They compete for championships every year no matter who their quarterback is).
3. A quarterback who was a multi-year starter (i.e. not Lance. He started at North Dakota State in 2019, then played just one game in 2020 due to the pandemic, then he declared for the draft).
4. A quarterback who thrived in two-minute situations in college (i.e. not Lance. He famously had zero two-minute situations at North Dakota State).
5. A quarterback such as Mac Jones or Kenny Pickett (i.e. Not Lance).

It seems clear that when Scangarello talked about highly-drafted quarterbacks who fail, he was describing Lance. And if Scangarello truly believes Lance will be a bust, then the 49ers needed to get rid of Scangarello and replace him with someone who thinks Lance can be great.
It's too bad the 49ers wasted the first year of Lance's development under Scangarello's pessimistic watch.





 
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Quietly, the 49ers replaced quarterback coach Rich Scangarello this offseason with former NFL quarterback Brian Griese, who never has coached in his life. Now, Scangarello is the offensive coordinator at the University of Kentucky.

Why did the 49ers make the switch? Scangarello went on a podcast with Greg Cosell this offseason and explained how he evaluates draft-eligible quarterbacks. Here's what Scangerallo said. Tell me if he sounds like someone who wanted to coach Trey Lance:

Q: What properties in a college quarterback are teams looking for in the NFL?

SCANGARELLO: "Bottom line is do they have the toughness to stand in the pocket when they're getting hit and deliver when it matters most? If you cannot do that, and you cannot show me that on your college tape, I find it very difficult for you to be a top-tier quarterback in the NFL. I would say that's where most people in the evaluation process run into problems when they don't really take that one trait, in a contested pocket, how a quarterback plays a game in college football, and really evaluates those moments in a guy's career."

Q: In college football, there are lots of quarterbacks who don't work out of muddy, noisy pockets very often. You and I talked about Trevor Lawrence last summer, and in going through all of his tape, there were just 34 plays in which he actually worked through a muddy, noise pocket, and that's obviously not a large sample size to make a judgement about his ability to do that at the NFL level.

SCANGARELLO: "If you evaluate someone how they throw on air, or if they're in a system in college where the coach is telling them where to throw the ball before the snap and they know a small amount of plays, what's good against certain coverages, those things don't really mean anything to me in the evaluation process. If you're watching a (Pro Day) workout that a guy has been through 20 times and his coach has taught him the routine and you think that is going to determine his value in this league, I think you're going to miss a lot of the time. That's not real football. And these kids have been doing it since they were 15-years old and know how to master those things. There are no variables -- they're just throwing on air. You show me a guy, all his clips throughout his career, where they take it in the chin and not turn it down and make good decisions, or when the pocket is pushed on them -- that's the league. That's what it takes in the NFL. If you can't do that, you're not going to get that overnight in the NFL, and that's always going to be where you miss on a guy. If you can't see that in a player and there's not a lot of it on tape -- let's say Trevor (Lawrence) for example, and there have been other guys, Dwayne Haskins comes to mind, I think he was touched like 18 times in his senior year. It was ridiculous how few times he was in a contested pocket. If you're going to overlook those things, then you're going to have a huge margin for error with a miss on a guy."

Q: How do you evaluate quarterbacks who went to smaller schools such as Josh Allen and Trey Lance?

SCANGARELLO: "One of my favorite things about quarterbacks historically, the mid-major to smaller Power 5 schools -- those over the history of time have been some of the best players in this league. And when you can take a quarterback who's a multi-year starter at a mid-major for example, and he can take them a level that they've never season -- let's say they're an average program, and then all of a sudden for two years they're winning conference titles or competing for it -- that tells me that quarterback has the ability to raise the level of everyone around him. For Josh Allen at Wyoming, the two years he was there, they won more games than probably ever in the history of that program. They had never had eight-win seasons. I think they'd had one or two in the whole history of the program. That tells me the guy is a winner and he has the ability to elevate the people around him. Those things are important to me."

Q: What other quarterback traits are non-negotiables for you?

SCANGARELLO: "If you have any aspirations of playing a guy Year 1, he better have been a multi-year starter in college. To me, the experiences and taking the snaps and what you do when you're in charge and banking those reps are so important. You come out, you're a one-year guy, it's very difficult for you to just jump in and play in the league. You just haven't played enough football to hone your craft. So I'm always looking for guys who have a lot of starts. Do they take care of the football in those moments when it could go sideways, or do they create positive plays? Do they make smart decisions in critical situations? How do they play in two-minute situations? There are guys I've evaluated in recent drafts where they're on such good teams at Ohio State or these other schools where maybe they don't even have a two-minute situation that really matters in their entire career. Give me a guy who has played a lot of one-score games and found a way to win, and show me in those situations how he is under duress."

Q: What do you think of Kenny Pickett?

SCANGARELLO: "You could throw him in the Mac Jones mold. He's a multi-year starter, he took Pitt to some real high-level play, he has been very good with the ball, he's tough, he's good under duress, he won big games in the clutch -- all those things bode well...What is the elite trait? Do you want a guy who throws it hard and 70 yards or a guy that runs really fast, or do you want a guy who throws with anticipation, on time, allows Y.A.C., processes, a natural leader, those qualities?"

Let's summarize what Scangerallo said he values:

1. A quarterback who faced heavy pressure in the pocket during college and wasn't a Pro Day wonder (i.e. not Lance. North Dakota State had terrific pass protection, and he had a phenomenal Pro Day).
2. A quarterback who elevated his program (i.e. not Lance. North Dakota State is the best program in the FCS. They compete for championships every year no matter who their quarterback is).
3. A quarterback who was a multi-year starter (i.e. not Lance. He started at North Dakota State in 2019, then played just one game in 2020 due to the pandemic, then he declared for the draft).
4. A quarterback who thrived in two-minute situations in college (i.e. not Lance. He famously had zero two-minute situations at North Dakota State).
5. A quarterback such as Mac Jones or Kenny Pickett (i.e. Not Lance).

It seems clear that when Scangarello talked about highly-drafted quarterbacks who fail, he was describing Lance. And if Scangarello truly believes Lance will be a bust, then the 49ers needed to get rid of Scangarello and replace him with someone who thinks Lance can be great.
It's too bad the 49ers wasted the first year of Lance's development under Scangarello's pessimistic watch.





Great read....gives some interesting insights on this dude's likes and dislikes when it comes to the QB position....but....
but who is Rich Scangarfello and why should we care about what he thinks? Is the like the QB whisperer or something? Was he fired by Rat Boy or did this dude leave for another gig somewhere?
 

Merlin

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SCANGARELLO: "Bottom line is do they have the toughness to stand in the pocket when they're getting hit and deliver when it matters most? If you cannot do that, and you cannot show me that on your college tape, I find it very difficult for you to be a top-tier quarterback in the NFL.
This dude gets it.
 

RamDino

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Was he fired by Rat Boy or did this dude leave for another gig somewhere?
Sounds to me like he didn't care for Trey Lance at all. If that is the case, it's no wonder why he left. Either Shanahan fired him because he didn't like Lance, or he left on his own because he didn't want to be tied to Lance's future. @dpjax summarized it well... Scangarello never mentioned Trey Lance, but he described his background to a tee. This makes me very happy.