1. To unlock all of features of Rams On Demand please take a brief moment to register. Registering is not only quick and easy, it also allows you access to additional features such as live chat, private messaging, and a host of other apps exclusive to Rams On Demand.

Earthquake So CA

Discussion in 'OFF TOPIC' started by DR RAM, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. RamFan503

    RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

    Messages:
    10,511
    Credit:
    $3,852,174.71
    Name:
    Stu
    Meh. This last one was but a joy ride. I've been through several earthquakes in CA. And virtually every time it is a precursor for the "big one".

    I was reading an article the other day that said another Yellowstone eruption whould likely occur sometime between 30,000 and 120,000 years from now. Man - that's gonna suck. I'm already going to be a very old man by then. All that ash might just finish me off.

    BTW - here is the best source for everything Yellowstone volcanic activity.

    http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/yellowstone/yellowstone_sub_page_50.html
  2. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    RamFan503 likes this.
  3. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    Huge earthquake off Chile's north coast triggers tsunami

    SANTIAGO, April 1 (Reuters) - A major earthquake of magnitude 8.2 struck off the coast of northern Chile on Tuesday, causing five deaths and triggering a tsunami that pounded the shore with 2-meter-tall waves.

    Officials said the dead included people who were crushed by collapsing walls or were killed by heart attacks. The government evacuated Chile's northern coast and President Michelle Bachelet declared the area a disaster zone, promising troops and police reinforcements to maintain public order while damage was repaired after landslides blocked roads.

    The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake was shallow at 12.5 miles (20.1 km) below the seabed and struck about 100 km northwest of the mining port of Iquique near the Peruvian border.

    Yellowstone Volcano Eruption in 2014? Are Animals Fleeing Park As ‘An Alert’?
    By Zachary Stieber, Epoch Times | March 31, 2014
  4. Stranger

    Stranger How big is infinity?

    Messages:
    4,758
    Credit:
    $1,624,619.12
    Name:
    Hugh
    The Chilian earthquake is not an April fools?

    I'm not inclined to buy into anything from the "Epoch" Times :)
  5. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    Series of small earthquakes rock Oklahoma in record seismic activity
    [​IMG]
    By Carey Gillam

    (Reuters) - Earthquakes rattled residents in Oklahoma on Saturday, the latest in a series that have put the state on track for record quake activity this year, which some seismologists say may be tied to oil and gas exploration.

    One earthquake recorded at 3.8 magnitude by the U.S. Geological Survey rocked houses in several communities around central Oklahoma at 7:42 a.m. local time. Another about two hours earlier in the same part of the state, north of Oklahoma City, was recorded at 2.9 magnitude, USGS said.

    Those two were preceded by two more, at 2.6 magnitude, and 2.5 magnitude, that also rolled the landscape in central Oklahoma early Saturday morning. A 3.0 magnitude tremor struck late Friday night in that area as well, following a 3.4 magnitude hit Friday afternoon.

    Austin Holland, a seismologist with the Oklahoma Geological Survey who tracks earthquake activity for the USGS, said the earthquake activity in the state is soaring.

    "We have had almost as many magnitude 3 and greater already in 2014 than we did for all of 2013," Holland said.

    Last year's number of "felt" earthquakes - those strong enough to rattle items on a shelf - hit a record 222 in the state. This year, less than four months into the year, the state has recorded 253 such tremors, according to state seismic data.

    "We have already crushed last year's record for number of earthquakes," Holland said.

    Most earthquakes occur naturally. But scientists have long linked some small earthquakes to oil and gas work underground, which can alter pressure points and cause shifts in the earth.

    Oil and gas exploration has increased in recent years across the country, spurred by U.S. efforts for energy independence. Modern hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is one particularly controversial technique.

    For bigger quakes, so far this year the state has recorded 106 at 3.0 magnitude and above, according to Holland. For all of last year the state had 109 at 3.0 and above.

    In November 2011, Oklahoma suffered a 5.6 magnitude quake that damaged more than a dozen homes and several businesses.

    Wastewater disposal related to the fracking is suspected by many scientists to contribute to the earthquake activity. Millions of gallons of wastewater are typically trucked from a fracking site to wells where the water is injected thousands of feet underground into porous rock layers. That work, if done near a fault, can trigger larger quakes, according to several recent scientific studies.

    Oklahoma recorded 278 earthquakes from 2008 through 2013 that have registered on the Richter scale at a magnitude of 3.0 or greater, a level that can shake objects inside a home.

    Before that, from 1975-2008, the state on average recorded less than six earthquakes a year.

    (Reporting by Carey Gillam; Editing by Dan Grebler)
  6. RamFan503

    RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

    Messages:
    10,511
    Credit:
    $3,852,174.71
    Name:
    Stu
    The Sherriff is a near. Er... the end... or sumptin.
    [​IMG]

    So it begs the question... Did OK get any new recording equipment maybe sometime around... oh - I dunno.... 2008?

    I'm not defending fracking as I have to suspect you are going to get some kind of ill effect from it but so many of these reports are dubious at best.

    BTW - my wife was saying just yesterday (and we weren't even talking about it as the subject) that the person who video'd the buffalo supposedly leaving Yellowstone said that the buffalo were actually heading toward Yellowstone and appeared to be playing and romping around. BTW.... he also said he shot the video about two weeks before the quake.

    It gets pretty silly at times. Facts are one thing but if I were to start with an end goal in mind, I could make stats say pretty much anything I wanted them to say. My problem with it is that it belittles real science and when there is a real problem that should be dealt with, chicken little has had one too many acorns pop him in the skull cap for anyone to take him seriously.
  7. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    2 POWERFUL EARTHQUAKES HIT SOLOMON ISLANDS

    BY NICK PERRY
    ASSOCIATED PRESS


    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- Two strong earthquakes struck the Solomon Islands on Sunday, triggering tsunami warnings, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or damage.

    People throughout the Pacific island chain awoke to a strong quake at 7:14 a.m., government spokesman George Herming said. People on Makira and nearby islands southeast of the capital, Honiara, reported seeing three large waves after that temblor, he said.

    The magnitude-7.6 quake's epicenter was 323 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Honiara, at a depth of 29 kilometers (18 miles), according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Late Sunday night, a magnitude-7.4 quake struck in the same area at a depth of 35 kilometers (22 miles), the USGS said. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued a warning for the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea following that temblor.

    4.9-magnitude earthquake rattles central Idaho

    CHALLIS, Idaho (AP) — A 4.9-magnitude earthquake shook central Idaho, flinging items off walls and scaring residents but otherwise producing no reported damage or injuries in the sparsely populated mountain area.

    USGS geophysicist Dale Grant says the earthquake was "kind of an unusual occurrence" being the first one of its strength in the area since 2005. But he said even minor damage is unlikely because of the remote location. It struck 8 miles northwest of Challis, a town of around 1,000 less than 200 miles northeast of Boise.

    Custer County sheriff's dispatcher Liz Preston says besides "things falling off walls and a lot of scared people," no one was hurt. She says the area has had some quakes lately, but this one felt "pretty big" compared with the others.

    She says the office shook, including the windows and computers.
  8. Angry Ram

    Angry Ram aka Captain RAmerica aka the OG Rammer

    Messages:
    5,654
    Credit:
    $3,450,490.19
    And hydraulic fracturing has been done since the 1950s. The bigger concern is the water used in the process b/c it's water w/ a special blend of chemicals. And when it's extracted back, its then dumped into rivers, lakes, etc. that could be contaminated. No one wants to talk about that.

    Fracturing and seismic activity is just seems dumb to me. I find it very hard to believe humans can inject that much energy to cause raw earth to move along fault lines.
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
  9. LesBaker

    LesBaker Mr. Savant

    Messages:
    4,894
    Credit:
    $3,745,456.92
    Name:
    Les
    I've been in a nasty hurricane and it can be disconcerting to say the least.

    I was also in a kinda rare type of storm called a Bow Echo. That was bizarre and took out trees, roofs, tops of gas stations that cover the pump areas, all kinds of stuff. It lasted just a couple of hours and then was gone, but it was a very intense couple of hours.
  10. Angry Ram

    Angry Ram aka Captain RAmerica aka the OG Rammer

    Messages:
    5,654
    Credit:
    $3,450,490.19
    I've been in a tornado a couple years ago. Well not in one, but there was one about .5 mile from my house which ripped the roof off a shopping center there. I think they categorized it as a F3. It's definently nerve wracking especially when it's in the middle of the night.
  11. RamFan503

    RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

    Messages:
    10,511
    Credit:
    $3,852,174.71
    Name:
    Stu
    I'm not saying you're wrong so don't take this the wrong way. But do you actually know this to be true? I'd have to guess the water at minimum has to go through a treatment process and then testing.

    On a property I managed, we were putting a municipal well into an aquifer that hadn't been tapped before. It was the deepest well in the state at the time. While it was known to be mainly fresh water, the contents of salts and other potential minor contaminants were not known. We had to collect not only the water we were initially pulling out but also test samples for several weeks before we could run the well off into another retention pond that would filter the water through the ground or be processed through our sewer treatment facility. And that was just for a well that was to be used for drinking water. The initial testing was to make sure we were not contaminating the more shallow aquifer and the nearby streams - not to see if it was fit for human consumption. Those tests came later.
  12. bluecoconuts

    bluecoconuts Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,698
    Credit:
    $3,503,606.50
    Yeah, that's too much for me. I would enjoy a good thunderstorm, semi-heavy rain, some wind but nothing crazy. When I was in the Army stationed in the Southeast we got them every so often and I enjoyed them (at least when I wasn't out in the field and could just sit in my barracks room and relax), but we never get anything like that here in Southern California other than a 5 minute flash every so often and some sprinkling for about a week. I love the weather here, but I need to move somewhere that gets a little more change for a little bit. I'm getting bored with this.
  13. LesBaker

    LesBaker Mr. Savant

    Messages:
    4,894
    Credit:
    $3,745,456.92
    Name:
    Les
    Let me tell you blue....the bow echo thing was freaky. It got dark like middle of the night dark in the middle of the afternoon right out of nowhere and the rain was going sideways from this powerful nonstop wind. No gusts, just nonstop hard wind. Power went out all over town. Lawn and patio furniture in the development I was in at the time was scattered all over everyone's yard.

    Then POOF......the storm was finished and it was sunshine and blue skies. Like a mini hurricane but scarier.
  14. Angry Ram

    Angry Ram aka Captain RAmerica aka the OG Rammer

    Messages:
    5,654
    Credit:
    $3,450,490.19
    True, water gets treated, but only if it goes through a POTW. Sometimes these guys just dump it into a random body of water or field.

    And you are talking salts and "minor contaminants", what exactly is that? Fracturing water contains chemicals like hydrochloric acid, isoproponal, ammonium persulfate, dimethyl formamide, and along w/ others like citric acid and silica (sand).

    IMO, that stuff regardless of contamination level, is more concerning than human beings being able to apply so much pressure to cause 1000s upon 1000s of tons of rock to move.
  15. Stranger

    Stranger How big is infinity?

    Messages:
    4,758
    Credit:
    $1,624,619.12
    Name:
    Hugh
    And this is one reason we have every kind of filter known to man installed in our home drinking water system. I've grown tired of drinking chemical cocktails and then having to flush my thyroid, liver and skin in order to purges all of it.
    Prime Time likes this.
  16. RamFan503

    RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

    Messages:
    10,511
    Credit:
    $3,852,174.71
    Name:
    Stu
    No - that's the point of my question. They made us test and filter for things as minor as salts. I'd have to think the governing bodies would certainly be making them test and filter for the kinds of toxins you mentioned. We couldn't shake a stick without hitting a government official during our operation. And I was stunned at how many gov't agencies there were that wanted to see the test results (WES, DEQ, OFWD, ESD, CCHHSD, USFS... cripes! it was ridiculous) and verify where the water was going, how much we were removing from the hole, etc... And we weren't taking anything out of the hole that was truly toxic.
  17. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    I boil all tap water before drinking it or using it for cooking.
  18. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    Hundreds of earthquakes strike central Idaho, rattling nerves
    [​IMG]
    By Laura Zuckerman

    SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - Hundreds of low-level and medium-sized earthquakes have struck central Idaho since last month, puzzling geologists who wonder whether the ruptures portend a much larger temblor to come or are merely the rumblings of a seismic fault previously thought to be dormant.

    The recent earthquake swarm, beginning on March 24 and climaxed by a 4.9 magnitude tremor on Saturday, has produced no reports of injuries or severe damage but has rattled nerves in a region where Idaho's most powerful known quake, measured at 6.9, killed two children in 1983.

    Saturday's earthquake was the strongest recorded in the state since 2005 and was followed on Monday by a magnitude 4.4 event that struck 10 miles north of the small ranching community of Challis, Idaho, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

    The Challis tremor knocked pictures and animal mounts from walls, rattled dishes off tables and was felt by residents in neighboring Montana more than 100 miles from the quake's epicenter, officials said.

    The latest seismic surge, including 100 small to moderate quakes on Monday alone, has galvanized government scientists, who planned to install special seismometers in the area as early as Tuesday to more closely track the activity.

    The likelihood of a severe earthquake coming on the heels of the recent swarm is low, but much is perplexing about the series of tremors, said Bill Phillips, a geologist with the Idaho Geological Survey at the University of Idaho.

    Such earthquake swarms typically are associated with the movement of molten rock below ground, which geologists credited for the recent quake cluster at Yellowstone National Park, or they are linked to an active fault, he said on Tuesday.

    "What has many of us scratching our heads is the present-day swarm doesn't appear to be on the big, active fault in the area that ruptured in 1983 and caused the largest earthquake in Idaho," Phillips said.

    He was referring to the magnitude 6.9 temblor that struck Mount Borah, Idaho's tallest peak, killing two children in Challis and damaging hundreds of homes and businesses.

    Idaho sits at the center of a seismic belt in the intermountain West that runs from northwestern Montana to southern Nevada and contains thousands of faults in the Earth's crust, said Michael Stickney, director of earthquake studies at the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology.

    Carl Alexander, disaster coordinator in Challis, said schools have stepped up earthquake drills, and he has requested that emergency responders in Idaho and Utah be available if disaster strikes.

    Alexander is advising local residents to keep bottled water and canned goods on hand just in case "a big shaker" should strike.

    "It does make your heart race a little bit to see your windows vibrating," he said of the recent tremors.

    (Reporting by Laura Zuckerman; Editing by Steve Gorman and Ken Wills)
  19. RamFan503

    RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

    Messages:
    10,511
    Credit:
    $3,852,174.71
    Name:
    Stu
    I drink boiling tap water and spit out ice cubes.
    Stranger likes this.
  20. Prime Time

    Prime Time RODerator

    Messages:
    2,911
    Credit:
    $2,746,443.78
    Name:
    Peter
    Is this Javeon Clowney or Chuck Norris? :cool: