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Claiborne scores a four on Wonderlic

Discussion in 'RAMS - NFL TALK' started by -X-, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. RamFan503 Grill and Brew Master

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Well if he scored a 4 - maybe HE did.
     
    #21
  2. -X- Not into the whole brevity thing.

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    You can always try it for yourself. I "found this" on the internet somewhere. [​IMG]

    Take the wonderlic
     
    #22
  3. steferfootball Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    I'll take it later with some timing down. But I looked over some questions, and I don't understand the low scores.

    Claborne has a learning disability, so that is understandable, but there are plenty of guys who don't and only score in the 10s.
     
    #23
  4. superfan24 Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    I know I'm just be a homer and getting off topic too, but if you have a chance look up Manti Teo's daily schedule during certain days at ND. I believe maybe 5-10 people would be able to go through it on a daily basis. Then I see players getting 4 on the wonderlic....great example for our youth lol
     
    #24
  5. superfan24 Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    :rofl: that was good
     
    #25
  6. superfan24 Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    seriously I think a 1st grader knows the 6th month of the year.
     
    #26
  7. DR RAM Rams Lifer

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Everyone knows it May. :p
     
    #27
  8. superfan24 Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Manti Te'o ‏ @MTeo_5

    Close

    Studied till 2am. Woke up at 5. Worked out at 6. Midterm at 9. Presentation at 11. Paper due at 1. Project due at 3. Class from 11-6.


    I know there was another report on his schedule,but I found this quickly on a search on google.
    From his twitter.
     
    #28
  9. Yamahopper Well-Known Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    WTH.
    What kind of test is this. Why would they give such a thing. Do they get a pencil and scratch paper? If not the math should be doable in your head.
    When I used to hear of someone getting a 40 on it I thought "hey he's a rocket scientist" cause that test must be hard.
    But now I know better. Color me disillusioned.
     
    #29
  10. -X- Not into the whole brevity thing.

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    A learning disability coupled with a timer on that test could be brutal. Especially if it's dyslexia. Take a look at the last question, for example, and try to do that with the timer going (10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4... ) freak! "B!" Like I said, he'll get a chance to take it over again, and he'll probably do better.

    Frank Gore got a 6.

    Vince Young got a 6, retook it, and got a 16.

    Mamula got a 49.

    Alex Smith beat Peyton Manning by 12.

    Ray Lewis got a 13. Moss a 12.

    Something tells me that Claiborne is still going to be able to mirror receivers and shut down half the field. And if he becomes a Ram, then he can pick off passes and look at flash cards on the sidelines while the offense is on the field for all I care.
     
    #30
  11. Ramhusker Well-Known Member Pit Boss

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.


    I hear ya. I have a son that has Tourettes and all the ADD/OCD etc that come with it. He's really a smart kid but can't do math at all. I mean none. 10% of any number blows his mind. But, he is advanced everywhere else so I think he would struggle with the math but a 4? I don't know man.
     
    #31
  12. Ramhusker Well-Known Member Pit Boss

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    I agree. Same as when Virginia does well in sports, I'm impressed because of their academics.
     
    #32
  13. steferfootball Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    LOL. I just got it now. :rofl:
     
    #33
  14. HitStick Active Member

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Book smarts don't make foozball players.
     
    #34
  15. Anonymous Guest

    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    I knew a football academic all-american at LSU.

    A center. I forget his name.

    It's not LSU, it's college football. Tutors, special accomodations, extra help for learning disabilities. They have whole crews that work on that. The football team at a place like LSU is a money-maker and always gets a lot of leeway. And there's the fact that a guy like Claiborne, who has the disabilities he has, might never have gotten a degree if not for that kind of abundant support staff.
     
    #35
  16. DR RAM Rams Lifer

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    But it's not ALL college football. Every state school, for instance, has admission standards. Some schools don't have any.

    I have no problem with any school helping any student...it's a good thing to help people with disabilities. I think we would all agree with that.
     
    #36
  17. Anonymous Guest

    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Admissions standards are flexible and do include accomodation for learning disabilities. That's everywhere, regardless whether or not a school has a team. But schools with teams also see those kinds of support services receiving wider support and funding.

    LSU has admission standards. They can even be looked up.

    The real point is, no one can make a judgement about the academic standards and academic integrity of an entire university based upon news of one student athlete with an avowed learning disability.
     
    #37
  18. -X- Not into the whole brevity thing.

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    Re: LSU must have a REALLY easy curriculum.

    Claiborne mocked over archaic test


    Peter Schrager
    Apr 4, 2012
    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/Morr ... ore-040312



    I spoke with Ryan Fitzpatrick, the Harvard-educated starting quarterback of the Buffalo Bills, around NFL Combine time last year. Draft prospects were taking the Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test in Indianapolis and I wanted to chat with a guy who’d nearly aced it.

    When Fitzpatrick took the Wonderlic in 2005, he got just one question wrong. His score was reportedly one of the highest ever recorded by an NFL Draft prospect.

    “Is the Wonderlic a good indicator of how a player will perform at the next level?” I asked Fitzpatrick, expecting a thorough Ivy League analysis of the test, its benefits, and the way it pinpoints the league’s next superstars.

    He just laughed.

    And then he laughed again.

    Fitzpatrick said that although he could see a potential connection between answering 50 questions against a ticking clock in a classroom and being able to process information at a rapid pace on the field, he wouldn’t read too much into a prospect’s test scores.

    “[hil]Dan Marino had a low score when he took it, right?” He asked. “I think his career turned out just fine.[/hil]”

    I thought about my conversation with Fitzpatrick on Tuesday when ProFootballTalk.com’s report that Morris Claiborne scored a 4 out of 50 on his Wonderlic hit the web in the early a.m. hours.

    I cringed when I saw the deluge of Twitter and message board snark that followed. My emails about the news were drenched in hackneyed jokes and lazy cracks.

    “Will the team that drafts him draw up the plays in crayon for him?” One reader wrote. Quickly followed by, “Just kidding. Where do you see him going now?”

    I just finished watching several of Claiborne’s LSU game tapes, and I can tell you with great confidence that he is the top college cornerback we’ve seen enter the NFL Draft since Darrelle Revis left Pittsburgh in 2007. Claiborne was a better corner in college than his teammate Patrick Peterson and had better range than 2010’s seventh overall pick, Joe Haden.

    Claiborne is a good kid, too. Ask anyone who follows the SEC and has had the chance to cross paths with him, and they’ll tell you that he’s a soft-spoken, polite kid from Shreveport, La.

    [hil]He also has a learning disability.[/hil]

    According to Greg Gabriel at the National Football Post, Claiborne’s disability — though not specified— isn’t a secret around the league. When he was recruited out of high school, it was made clear to the various big-time college programs courting him that he’d need academic advisors and assistance in the classroom once he selected a school.

    After deciding to attend LSU, Claiborne didn’t fade away and let the rigors of the college environment swallow him whole. [hil]He worked with tutors and utilized LSU’s various on-campus learning resources to get the grades he needed to stay academically eligible and compete.[/hil]

    Claiborne’s time in college should be celebrated. Hell, it’d make for a decent movie. Local kid defies the odds, attends the state’s university, gets enrolled in the right classes and goes on to make millions starring in the NFL. It’s as feel-good a story as you’ll get in today’s world of college athletics.

    Instead, Claiborne is the joke of the Internet this week. He’s the “idiot” and the “jock” that couldn’t break double digits on an archaic, obsolete test that has no real relevance. He’s forced to defend himself on Twitter, as he did Tuesday, when he sent out a string of Tweets, including one that read, “If u don't have haters u not doing something! It's good to know I do. So keep tweeting. I love it!”

    Whether Claiborne even scored a 4 is really neither here nor there, though.

    [hil]The real issue is that the report was even leaked at all.[/hil] Whether true or false, it’s a nefarious act from an individual or individuals who clearly have some incentives to damage a young man.

    Did the score come from a team that wants to draft Claiborne and thought the information would stray another team away from doing so? Or was it from an agent trying to better position his own client, potentially a top cornerback, himself? You’ll drive yourself crazy playing Andy Sipowicz trying to figure that one out.

    But we should know.

    We should have the name of the tough guy who went public with information that’s supposed to be highly confidential.

    The NFL conducts these tests in what are described as highly secure environments. The results are not intended to be leaked. And yet, here we are today, and Claiborne’s woeful Wonderlic is the biggest football headline of the day.

    [hil]The truth is, Claiborne’s score won’t impact his draft stock in April. I assure you that he’ll be the first cornerback taken in the draft, regardless of how he performed with a No. 2 pencil in Indy.[/hil]

    He’ll get over it. He’ll use it as motivation. He’ll come out angry and he’ll have a fine NFL career. This will all be forgotten and five years from now, the same message board commenters that were mocking him today will be wearing his jersey and selling his game-used mouth guard on eBay.

    [hil]But the slime that sheepishly — and worse off, anonymously — shared his score with a media outlet will never have to deal with it. He’ll continue to sit on his computer behind a desk and just know that he made a good kid feel bad today. He’ll know that he leaked a kid with a learning disability’s standardized test score to the world without providing any of the context that should have gone along with it.[/hil]

    He’ll sleep fine and likely won’t have to face any repercussions.

    But I wish he would.

    Roger Goodell’s all about security and the purity of the game. His stance on Bountygate was aggressive and firm. If the NFL is going to ask its draft prospects to take an exam under the assumption that the results won’t be made public, they should honor that agreement. Otherwise, why would any of these kids even bother?

    Morris Claiborne could have walked out of that room and said, “I’ll be a top-10 pick regardless of what I score on this. What’s the point?” Hell, if his score’s going to be discussed on SportsCenter three weeks before the draft, he should have done that.

    If you’re going to hold these kids responsible and ask them to honor their end of the pre-draft process, you should hold all parties responsible for it, too.

    Maybe I’m getting too worked up over this.

    [hil]After all, the test means nothing.

    Just ask the guy who nearly aced it.[/hil]
     
    #38